Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts

current exhibitions

The Legacy of Frankenstein
Saturday, 20 October, 2018 to Sunday, 23 December, 2018

Heather Dewey-Hagbord and Chelsea E. Manning, Probably Chelsea, 2017. Photo: Paula Abreu Pita.

HyperPrometheus commemorates the 200th anniversary of the publishing of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus (1818).

Considered by some to be the first science fiction novel, Frankenstein is both a celebration and warning of the seductive powers and unforeseen outcomes of scientific advancement. It uncannily predicted a world in which humans are able to overcome our limitations through human/non-human hybridity, reproductive and genetic manipulation.

Featuring Australian and international artists, HyperPrometheus re-contextualises Frankenstein for the new millennium within the realms of contemporary and biological arts. Monsters and monstrous creatures abound, in works that test our understanding of what it is to be human, living, natural, functional, valid or valued. Curated by Oron Catts, Laetitia Wilson and Eugenio Viola.

Presented by Perth Festival and PICA
Sunday, 10 February, 2019 to Sunday, 14 April, 2019

Cassils, Alchemic no.4, 2017, Archival pigment print, plexi faced and aluminum backedPhoto: Cassils with Robin Black.

Cassils has achieved international recognition for a rigorous engagement with the body as a form of social sculpture. Through a practice spanning more than 15 years Cassils has ‘tackled the complicated politics of transgender visibility and its intertwinement with the politics of form’ (Artforum).

Cassils’ first exhibition in Australia features video, photography and sculpture, as well as a presentation of their iconic performance, Becoming an Image.

Habitually using their own body as medium, Cassils changes it through rigorous training and nutrition schedules to create artworks that offer shared experiences for contemplating histories of violence, representation, struggle and survival. Keenly aware of art history, Cassils’ approach to art form and representation re-frames the gaze and subverts art’s historical canon.

Cassils’ body – defiant, strong and transgender – is the through line of their body of work. With breathtaking skill and finesse, the artist uses their body to question attitudes and society structures, revealing the damaging inadequacies of simplistic binaries and mainstream hegemonies of power.