listings

Wednesday, 21 August, 2019 to Saturday, 7 September, 2019

Image Credit: Unnamed by Priscilla Beck, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

Priscilla Beck's exhibition Unnamed questions the meaning of art-making and experience within a gallery space. The installation is created by repairing the gallery with porcelain clay, which, over time, shrinks, cracks and falls away. The work contemplates and critiques medium, material and site.

OPENING / 6pm, 21st August 2019

EXHIBITION / 21st August – 7th September 2019

METRO ARTS GALLERY 2, level 2

The gallery is free to visit. Visiting hours are 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday and 2pm to 4pm Saturday.

Wednesday, 21 August, 2019 to Saturday, 7 September, 2019

Span by Torin Francis, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

Gyre comprises site responsive installation, sculpture and moving image works that repurpose and re-contextualise objects that gauge and harness weather-related phenomena.
Francis reconstitutes the relations of these objects through their spatial and temporal positioning within the gallery space to explore the way in which the passing of time is perceived.

OPENING / 6pm, 21st August month 2019

EXHIBITION / 21st August – 7th September 2019

METRO ARTS GALLERY, level 2

The gallery is free to visit. Visiting hours are 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday and 2pm to 4pm Saturday.
 

Wednesday, 24 July, 2019 to Saturday, 10 August, 2019

Image Credit: Cuts by Grace Blake, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

Grace Blake's exhibition will be comprised of predominantly new work that considers a future dominated by non-human and hybridised beings. Blake will model formative anatomies and ecologies through the use of digital modelling software and 3D printing combined with 2D elements.

OPENING / 6pm, 24th July 2019

EXHIBITION / 24th July – 10th April 2019

METRO ARTS GALLERY 2, level 2

The gallery is free to visit. Visiting hours are 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday and 2pm to 4pm Saturday.
 

Wednesday, 24 July, 2019 to Saturday, 10 August, 2019

Flash Lights in Low Visibility investigates the detachment of incarcerated members of our community, who are never returned to full citizenship. The exhibition is concerned with the way that the legal framework and isolation of prison reproduces specific individualizing and moralizing systems. Heightened rates of Indigenous and Transgender incarceration undermine the validity of these systems. In considering these imbalances, the work also draws attention to the organization of space as a force for policing binaries, and for determining both the hyper-visibility and the invisibility of non-binary individuals.

OPENING / 6pm, 24th July 2019

EXHIBITION / 24th July – 10th August 2019

METRO ARTS GALLERY, level 2

The gallery is free to visit. Visiting hours are 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday and 2pm to 4pm Saturday.

Wednesday, 26 June, 2019 to Saturday, 13 July, 2019

Image Credit: The Boy Diver by Alex Pyren, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

The Boy Diver draws on a euphoric and emotional moment from the artist’s childhood to represent moments of self-determination, hope and futurity, awakening queer potentialities and energies that seem unclear in the present in order to revisualise the future.

OPENING / 6pm, 26th June 2019

EXHIBITION / 26th June – 13th July 2019

METRO ARTS GALLERY 2, level 2

The gallery is free to visit. Visiting hours are 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday and 2pm to 4pm Saturday.

Wednesday, 26 June, 2019 to Saturday, 13 July, 2019

Image Credit: M/other Land by Roberta Rich, 2018. Image by Lyndon Campbell

We Koppel, We Dala reflects upon South African Apartheid history to consider adjacent histories of colonial oppression and their ongoing impacts. The exhibition presents archival documents and new video works that together focus on land, representation, identity, loss, migration, memory and the importance of resistance and self-determination.

OPENING / 6pm, 26th June 2019

EXHIBITION / 26th June – 13th July 2019

METRO ARTS GALLERY, level 2

The gallery is free to visit. Visiting hours are 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday and 2pm to 4pm Saturday.

M/other Land premiered at Arts House as part of Next Wave 2018. M/other Land is supported by Next Wave and the City of Melbourne through Arts House. This project was assisted by The Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship. The program is administered by the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA).

Wednesday, 18 September, 2019 to Saturday, 5 October, 2019

Image Credit: The Longing by Sophie Bottomley, 2018. Image by Simon Hardy.

Sophie Bottomley's Shy Love is a new body of work featuring sculptural objects that capture moments of physical tension between two bodies. The exhibition will explore the bodily sensations we experience when we desire someone, highlighting the encounter between the masculine and feminine.

OPENING / 6pm, 18th September 2019

EXHIBITION / 18th September – 5th October 2019

METRO ARTS GALLERY 2, level 2

The gallery is free to visit. Visiting hours are 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday and 2pm to 4pm Saturday.

BY ALEXANDRA SPENCE
Wednesday, 18 September, 2019 to Saturday, 5 October, 2019

Image credit: Listening with the river by Alexandra Spence, 2016, Audain Gallery Vancouver. Photo by Lukas Engelhardt.

Alexandra Spence's The cities, they tremble is a three-part audio-visual installation that traces the connections between place, identity and sound. The exhibition presents three works that consider the dynamic nature of the world, using sound as a way to reveal vibrancy within 'inanimate' domestic objects.

OPENING / 6pm, 18th September 2019

EXHIBITION / 18th September – 5th October 2019

METRO ARTS GALLERY, level 2

The gallery is free to visit. Visiting hours are 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday and 2pm to 4pm Saturday.

 

Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 14 December, 2019

Jacobus Capone
Dark Learning 2015 (detail)
7-channel video, high definition, colour, audio duration 0:22:21 mins
Collection of The University of Queensland, purchased 2017.
Reproduced courtesy of the artist.

Jacobus Capone’s Dark Learning (2015) is an immersive seven-channel film installation that unfolds in performative gestures within extreme locales. Dark Learning tests the body and asks questions about our relationship to the natural world and how we come to learn about it. Capone is invested in the Chinese philosophical concept Xuanxue, which literally translates as the learning of the mysterious and profound. Xuanxue encourages a distancing of intellectualisation from actions, instead placing faith in sensation to embrace a deliberate unknowing.

Dark Learning was acquired by UQ Art Museum in late 2017.

Western Australian artist Jacobus Capone is known for his ambitious performances that are often undertaken in remote landscapes without an audience. Capone uses his body to endure extreme conditions as a way of connecting to the environment he is in. He received a Bachelor of Visual Arts, Edith Cowan University, WA in 2007. Recent solo exhibitions include: Double enigma, Michael Bugelli Gallery at ‘the tunnel’, Old Mercury Building, Hobart (2018); Passage, Turner Galleries, Perth (2018); and Forgiving night for day, Perth Institute of Contemporary Art as part of Perth International Arts Festival, Perth (2017). Recent group exhibitions include: Hadleys Art Prize (finalist), Hadley’s Orient Hotel, Hobart (2017); Primavera, MCA (2017); and Ramsay Art Prize, Art Gallery of South Australia (2017).

Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 31 August, 2019

John Baldessari, Wall Painting, initially curated by Tara McDowell at MADA Gallery, Monash University in October-November 2017.

Renowned American conceptual artist John Baldessari’s Wall Painting will be staged at UQ Art Museum in collaboration with UQ students. Existing only as a concept for over 50 years, Wall Painting was first initiated in late 2017 by curator Tara McDowell at Monash University, Melbourne. The concept is simple: each day a new UQ student is invited to paint one wall of the UQ Art Museum a single colour – any colour – of their choosing, in exchange for an honorarium. Over 31 days, a different student will paint the same wall a different colour. Participants negotiate with one another to learn about time, decision-making and its relationship to their labour.

Forum: August 31, 2019

Curated by Freja Carmichael
Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 14 December, 2019

Freja Carmichael and artworks.
Photo: Simon Woods.

Top left
Maria Ware
reclaimed fishing net (ghost net) 2012
image 46 x 33 x 33 cm
Collection of The University of Queensland, purchased with the assistance of Margaret Mittelheuser AM and Cathryn Mittelheuser AM, 2013.

Top right
Abe Muriata
Jawun 2016
twined lawyer vine (Calamus caryotoides)
overall 78 x 53 x 35 cm
Collection of The University of Queensland, purchased 2016.

Centre
Hersey Yungaporta
Basket 2005
cabbage palm fibre with natural dyes
overall 7.5 x 31 x 31 cm
Collection of The University of Queensland. Gift of an anonymous donor to commemorate the University's Centenary, 2010.

Lower right
Rita Wikmunea
Basket 2005
grasses with natural dyes
overall 5 x 25.5 x 25.5 cm
Collection of The University of Queensland, purchased 2006.

Guest curator Freja Carmichael presents Weaving the Way featuring works from the UQ Art Collection. This exhibition makes visible the layers of meaning and wisdom carried in contemporary fibre works by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. Honouring visual languages of the past through form, material and technique, the artists included in this exhibition weave together the spiritual, cultural and historical.

Artist list to be announced.

Freja Carmichael is a Ngugi woman belonging to the Quandamooka People of Moreton Bay. A graduate of UQ’s Master of Museum Studies program (2014), Carmichael is a curator working across the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander visual arts and culture sector. Carmichael recently curated Around and within, Space Gallery, Sydney (2018), and was a co-curator of The Commute, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane (2018). Carmichael is also a member of Brisbane-based Indigenous curatorial trio, Blaklash Collective. In 2014, Carmichael received an Australia Council for the Arts Emerging Curator’s Fellowship with Redland Art Gallery and was awarded the National Gallery of Australia International Indigenous Arts Fellowship at Aboriginal Art Museum Utrecht, The Netherlands (2016).

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 14 December, 2019

Lara Merrett
Reproduced courtesy of the artist, Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane and Tristian Koenig, Melbourne.
Photo: Hugh Stewart.

Sydney-based artist Lara Merrett presents High Stakes: a newly commissioned project in two parts. First, a temporary outdoor studio will inhabit the grounds in front of the UQ Art Museum. Over ten days the artist will host the UQ student community to make visible the practice of painting for the public. This will culminate in a large installation inside the Art Museum. Audiences can make physical contact with the paintings, altering assumptions about what painting can be, and how we can engage with it. 

Lara Merrett lives and works in Sydney. She studied painting at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid, Spain (1993) before completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts (1996) and a Master of Arts (Painting) (1997) at the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales. In February 2019, Merrett will curate and exhibit in Things we do together as part of ARTBAR, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney. Recent solo exhibitions include: Lady luck, Tristian Koenig, Melbourne (2018); High-rise, COMA Gallery, Sydney (2018); and Paint me in, Bella Room, MCA, Sydney (2018). 

Temporary studio: April 29 – May 10, 2019

Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 14 December, 2019

Unlearning brings together new and recent artworks, commissions, collection exhibitions, artists and creative thinkers. Running for an extended duration, Unlearning considers the ways in which artists gain, shed and unravel internalised learning about bodies, memory, culture, art, and social interaction, by embracing the idea of ‘not knowing’ through empathy and curiosity. Unlearning is not about forgetting. It is about being comfortable with doubt and strangeness.

To ‘unlearn’ takes many forms: the refutation of ‘old’ or unwanted ideas, the development of new knowledge, altered rituals, different ways of being together or new vantage points. The projects in Unlearning consider labour, repose, memory, history, improvisation, play, and making as potential ways to unlearn. 

Unlearning is the first in a series of extended research inquiries that will investigate and articulate the role of the Art Museum in its broader university context and artistic ecology. Collectively titled An Art Museum in Several Acts, we aim to invert the temporal role of art museums by engaging in long-term conversations with artists, students, and our communities. We will speculate on possible futures of art institutions, collections, and artistic practice with generosity, care, and transparency. 

Lara Merrett
High Stakes

Temporary studio: April 29 – May 10
Exhibition: July 26 – December 14

Weaving the Way
Curated by Freja Carmichael
Exhibition: July 26 – December 14

Elizabeth Willing
Through the Mother

Front Window Commission: June 4 – December 14
Exhibition: September 10 – December 14

John Baldessari
Wall Painting

In progress: July 26 – August 31

Jacobus Capone
Dark Learning

Exhibition: July 26 – December 14

Opening celebrations for Unlearning: Friday July 26

Friday, 1 March, 2019 to Saturday, 29 June, 2019

Naomi Blacklock
Padma 2018
Performance documentation from NETHERWORLDS exhibition, Spring Hill Reservoir, Brisbane, 9 June 2018.
Photo: Charlie Hillhouse 
Courtesy of the artist

Second Sight: Witchcraft, Ritual, Power brings together artists who conjure ideas related to witchcraft, sorcery and magical practices. The exhibition offers a space for intuition, rituals, collective happenings, incantations, and peripheral activity — practices recurrently dismissed as mere magical phenomena.   A series of renowned historic etchings counterbalance new artworks that depict or disrupt ‘witch iconography’ and impressions of witchcraft. Second Sight gives precedence to inexplicable occurrences, expressions of difference, the supernatural, sexual power, and the potency of the natural world in ways that are bodily and visceral yet also incorporeal.
 
The exhibition Second Sight: Witchcraft, Ritual, Power has been formed through a partnership between UQ Art Museum and UQ’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH). We are grateful for the valuable intellectual contributions that Dr Charlotte-Rose Millar, Dr Daniel Midena and Associate Professor Anna Johnston have made to this exhibition. We are also grateful to curators Samantha Littley, Michele Helmrich and Jessica O’Farrell for their research and leadership throughout the project.

Presented as part of the BRISBANE ART DESIGN Festival 2019
Friday, 10 May, 2019 to Saturday, 25 May, 2019

2000 Licks. 2014. Maiswürmer (Corn worms) connected with saliva. 45x30x30 and 40x35x25cm. Courtesy Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne.

 

Empty Inside is a new exhibition by Brisbane-based visual artist Elizabeth Willing. This exhibition is a continuation of her ongoing use of food as subject and medium, in order to materially explore the way food functions as a site of collective experience. Empty Inside draws a connection between processed snack food and packaging materials. Here, Willing considers the manufacture, transportation and consumption of products that are devoid of a use-value beyond their function as commodities. Performative methods of production, such as the use of saliva as an adhesive in the sculptures, imbues these mass produced foods with personal lived experience.

Elizabeth Willing’s practice utilises various types of food as a subject and medium, in order to materially think through the way food functions as a site of collective experience. Willing has exhibited extensively both nationally and internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include Dry (Tolarno Galleries, 2018 Melbourne Art Fair), Impossible Guest (New England Regional Art Museum) and Guava Season (Tolarno Galleries). She has undertaken several residencies, which include the New England Regional Art Gallery, HIAP Helsinki International Art Program and Australia Council Kunstlerhaus Bethanien residency. Willing is currently undertaking a Master of Fine Art at Queensland University of Technology.

Open 10am - 2pm Friday and Saturday or by appointment.

Artist Talk: 11am Saturday 25th of May

Elizabeth Willing is represented by Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne.