listings

Wednesday, 20 June, 2018 to Friday, 2 April, 2021

Space Pixels is an interactive light installation, made of mirrored stainless steel and intelligent pixels. The shapes and patterns are formed through reflections, changes in light, colour and intensity.

The installation, created by Nathan Street, explores methods for creating volumetric displays, using techniques found in kaleidoscopes. Multiple three-sided mirror kaleidoscopes allow the image to be viewed from multiple angles, creating the illusion of transparency and volume.

Microphones capture transient sound near the work that influence the patterns and intensity of the light. This allows the work to respond to the environment and be explored in playful ways.

Space Pixels is inspired by Atari 2600 computer games. Games like Space Invaders and Asteroids use simple animation techniques to create staggered movement as objects move around the screen, with coloured pixel explosions when asteroids are destroyed.

Friday, 30 August, 2019 to Sunday, 19 April, 2020

Custard (2011). Photograph by Stephen Booth.

 Adult $12 | Concession $9 | Family $30 

www.museumofbrisbane.com.au/whats-on/high-rotation/ 

High Rotation dives into the songs, stories and images of the Brisbane music scene, exploring a world of musicians, managers, labels, producers and venues. Featuring highlights over the past 30 years, High Rotation will reveal a snapshot of how popular music in Brisbane exploded from the local scene onto national and international stages. 

From the people who made the local music industry what it is today, hear how Brisbane’s popular music has adapted and responded to dynamic influences ranging from the social and political to the technological. 

High Rotation will share the journey of international careers launched from a Brisbane beginning, to the thriving music identity of the artists who stayed local. Immerse yourself in the music, feel the energy and experience the diversity of what makes Brisbane’s popular music scene unique. 

Friday, 13 September, 2019 to Sunday, 15 March, 2020

Anne Wallace, Assignation 1997. Oil on linen. City of Brisbane Collection, Museum of Brisbane.

 Free entry 

www.museumofbrisbane.com.au/whats-on/new-woman/ 

New Woman reveals the art, personal stories and enduring legacies of Brisbane’s most significant and ground-breaking female artists over the past 100 years. 

Fiercely independent, adventurous and often overlooked, Brisbane’s female artists have employed passion and determination to ensure art in Brisbane finds its voice. Each generation has produced artwork in response to the rapidly changing social, cultural and economic circumstances of the city. New Woman traces vast changes in ideas of gender, artistic styles, subject matter and ways of seeing the world through sculpture, painting and photography. 

Works from leading 1920s artists and advocates Daphne Mayo and Vida Lahey set the scene for the vital role women played in gaining respect and investment for the city’s arts. With Brisbane’s decreasing isolation in the following decades, new ideas of modernism and abstraction found unique interpretations in the works of female artists. 

While Brisbane artists such as Judy Watson, Fiona Foley, Tracey Moffatt and Davida Allen are contemporary leaders on the world stage, New Woman explores the influence of generations of women before them. 

New Woman will include significant historical and contemporary works from the Museum of Brisbane and City of Brisbane Collections, as well as loans from various institutions and private lenders.

Great Barrier Reef Corals, 1893, chromolithograph by W Saville-Kent. Photograph supplied by Jan Ross-Manley.

A focus on the artist’s response to the biodiversity of the Great Barrier Reef and sharing different examples depicting this, including scientific prints, specimens and artefacts, dating from the late 1800s through to tourist views of the 1950-1960s to current. Supported by the Gladstone Regional Council Regional Arts Development Fund (RADF). RADF is a partnership between the Queensland Government and Gladstone Regional Council to support local arts and culture in regional Queensland.

Image: Lionel LINDSAY 1874-1961 / Balconies, Venice n.d. / watercolour and pencil / 38.8 x 26.8cm sheet / Lionel Lindsay Gallery and Library Collection 044 / © National Library of Australia / Reproduced by kind permission 

This exhibition pays tribute to Marion Bolton (1908-1994) and her vital role, alongside her husband W.R.F. Bolton (1905-1973), to establish and maintain the Lionel Lindsay Gallery and Library Collection. The Lindsay Collection was officially opened to the public in 1959 and has been housed at Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery since 1994. 

Saturday, 1 February, 2020 to Sunday, 26 April, 2020

Image: Lionel LINDSAY 1874-1961 / John Preece ex libris n.d. [1928] / wood engraving (proof) / 6.7 x 5.6cm / Lionel Lindsay Gallery and Library Collection 132 / © National Library of Australia / Reproduced by kind permission 

The Lionel Lindsay Art Gallery and Library was established by W.R.F. (Bill) and Marion Bolton in Toowoomba in 1959. Writing to Lionel Lindsay himself in 1957, Bill Bolton had justly predicted that the library collection ‘will be something absolutely out of the box’ – meaning something excellent and outstanding. This exhibition uncovers some of the treasure hunts that made and still make the Lionel Lindsay Library outstanding. It showcases treasured items and tells stories about bibliophiles, collectors and dealers who assisted the Boltons to bring them together. 

Image: Nicola Moss, The porch 2019, paper collage, synthetic polymer paint, print, charcoal, graphite, natural ochre, oil pastel, ink on linen. Courtesy of the artists and Onespace Gallery. Photography by Carl Warner.

Adaption is an exhibition reflecting on the many values of healthy environments – ones we create for ourselves as communities and those larger forces beyond our control. Together, the work of Queensland artists Miles Allen, Helena Jackson-Lloyd and Nicola Moss, brings a dialogue in response to their contemporary relationship with Australian landscape.

Sunday, 2 February, 2020 to Sunday, 8 March, 2020

Image: Rachael Lee, Drifting 2019, linocut, stencil, collagraph and collage on Magnani Aquerello. 6 Courtesy of the artist.

Opening: 6.30pm Friday 7 February
Rachael Lee’s work is a direct response to feelings of connection with the positive experience of nature-based environments and unseen forces that create this attraction. While traveling through particular areas in Redlands, strong positive vibrations are felt by the artist as if – nature is whispering – an invitation to explore the area in closer detail.

Saturday, 8 February, 2020 to Sunday, 22 March, 2020

Jemima WYMAN / Pairabeenee People / Aggregate Icon (from centre to periphery: Free-Gaza protester, Palestine, 5th May 2012 (Che Guevara t-shirt), Anti-government protester, Milan, 14th December 2010 (screaming skull), Union member protester against labour and fiscal reform, Madrid, 31st March 2012 (striped t-shirt), Indigenous land rights protester, Caledonia, 28th February 2006 (camo hoodie)…)  2016 / hand-cut digital photographs, collage / 173 cm diameter / Mackay Regional Council Art Collection / Reproduced by kind permission.

Violent Salt brings together contemporary artists from across Australia representing diverse cultural heritage. Co-curated by Yhonnie Scarce and Claire Watson, the exhibition reflects on the experiences of the marginalised, the underrepresented and the silenced. The exhibition discusses issues surrounding racism and discrimination against First Nations peoples and minority groups as well as the lack of respect for, and desecration of culture and the natural environment. Violent Salt invites artists to speak their truths about these experiences and offers an opportunity for understanding and connection, whilst seeking to celebrate and honour Australia’s unique multiculturalism and landscape. 

Violent Salt is an Artspace Mackay Touring Exhibition co-curated by Yhonnie Scarce and Claire Watson.