listings

Wednesday, 4 October, 2017 to Saturday, 21 October, 2017

Thursday 5 October, 6pm - 8pm
Curated by Katie Paine, Mark all as Read is a discursive exhibition chronicling the experiences and collaborative practices of artists Nabilah Nordin and Nick Modrzewski.

The culmination of a series of correspondences between Paine, Nordin and Modrzewski as the two artists adjust to their new working and cultural environment in Singapore, the project uses art as a form of cross-cultural communication. As curator, Paine facilitates this body of work through letters, fictional writing and instruction pieces. Nordin and Modrzewski respond with poems, audio recordings, videos, drawings and paintings.

The project investigates broader notions of diaspora, cultural displacement, transitions in an artist’s practice, communication in the digital age and views artistic collaboration as correspondence. Nordin, who is originally from Singapore, will explore experiences of homecoming and cultural displacement. Meanwhile Modzrewski looks at his adjustment to a new city, and how this subsequently affects his practice. This exhibition is a further extension of Comfortable Living at C3 Contemporary.

Leanne Failla, Spring Street Residence,2013, paper, various

Opening Night: Thursday 14 September, 6pm - 8pm
A collection of objects to retain from a collection of objects to discard is a solo show by Leanne Failla that continues an exploration into objects and their role in forming scenario.
Failla’s work focuses on how the ‘event’ (with reference to Deleuze’s fold) is constructed and how the significance of perceptive anchor points influences the creation of an event. Using physical objects to reference anchor points, the work seeks the intangible aspects of event to address how heavily their presence defines a reading of situation.
In prior work, objects were related to function, design and volume. personal narrative comes into play in the new work as the artist chooses a selection of objects she owns to hold onto and replicates their form using other objects in her possession. The resulting forms are displayed in the gallery environment as new art objects which hold the value of “discard” and “retain”.
Leanne Failla is a Melbourne based artist with a practice focus on the structures of event and point of reference within events construction. She has a Bachelor of Design from RMIT University with Honours. She has held solo exhibitions at the Sheraton Hotel in Melbourne in 2014, Seventh Gallery in 2015 and C3 Contemporary Art Space in 2017. She has also collaborated on projects with Artland as part of Melbourne Fringe Festival and at Bundoora Homestead Art Centre in 2016.

Saturday, 26 August, 2017 to Sunday, 24 September, 2017

Eleanor and James Avery, Anastasia Booth, Sam Cranstoun,  Caitlin Franzmann & Kate Woodcroft, Kinly Grey, Daniel McKewen, Sarah Poulgrain, Sandra Selig, Tyza Stewart and David M Thomas.

Presentism looks back at ten years of Boxcopy’s history, through the lens of current practices of Brisbane-based artists who have participated in the program over that time. The title of the exhibition describes a tendency to interpret past events in terms of modern values and concepts. While often used negatively to critique particular accounts of history, in this case looking at the past through practices of the present testifies to the qualities of resilience and endurance that serve to sustain the practices of individual artist and the communities in which they operate.

Join us for the opening event on Saturday 26th August at 6pm and then for special events through September. Gallery opening hours are Friday and Saturday 2pm-6pm.

Wednesday, 4 October, 2017 to Saturday, 21 October, 2017

The Inaudible Song, 2017, video still. Images

OPENING NIGHT: Thurday 5 October 6pm - 8pm + Performance 6:30 - 7:10pm
Her Song is an exhibition that seeks to investigate a way to give presence to the intangible or the physicality of loss by examining the sensory dimensions of a performance-based installation. This attempt has been grounded in Aya Hamamoto’s personal reflections on grieving over her sister’s death, and responses through artworks to her profound connection with her late sister that continuously affects Hamamoto’s manner of being in the present.
Through a focus on the tactility of human voice, this exhibition explores the potential for the sensory relation of her voice with moving images to embody the evanescent texture of loss.

Hamamoto’s strong bond of sisterhood has motivated her to employ singing as a method to illuminate the radiance of her sister’s lost presence and the energetic essence of the young life. Her sister dedicated her life to her dream of becoming a musician, a dream cut short by her sudden death.

When Hamamoto sings a Japanese choral piece with silent interludes, she sees echoes of her sister’s powerful presence in the melody, recalling her memory of singing it together. By tracing the inaudible melody through her voice resembling her sister’s, the performance overlays the texture of her sister’s absent presence with her mortal body. Her durational singing ultimately generates a space to lament the ephemera of life.

Aya Hamamoto is an interdisciplinary artist who pursues themes of loss, memory, and Japanese aesthetics of temporality based on her experience of losing her sister. She works primarily with video, sound, performance and installation. Her art practice is concerned with how one’s artistic engagements can become a mode of being. Currently she is a candidate for a Master of Fine Arts (Visual Art) by research at the Victorian College of the Arts, the University of Melbourne. She received the Orloff Family Trust Scholarship from the VCA in 2014.
 

Fragments and Remnants (FAR)
Wednesday, 13 September, 2017 to Saturday, 30 September, 2017

Fragments and Remnants (FAR) is an installation using the destruction of visual art as the creation of performance by Jonathan Homsey. Inspired by Homsey’s own Syrian ancestry, FAR delves into how allegories and cultural information can be interpreted into a variety of stories and scenarios.

Homsey did not discover his ancestry until 2012, where he discovered his ancestry is from the village of Homs and Aleppo for many generations. FAR is Homsey’s platform for self discovery about his own heritage and to help gain empathy for the destruction of his ancestral cities of Homs and Aleppo.

Throughout the exhibition, four allegorical works of pottery will be destroyed as the impetus for choreography. A member of the general public will destroy one of the ceramic works and the broken pieces will deconstruct the original allegory. How stories can be misinterpreted over time is a constant battle in history and archaeology; FAR aims to explore the deconstruction of narratives through this series of four performances.

Wednesday, 23 August, 2017 to Saturday, 9 September, 2017

For BLINDSIDE Screen Series 2017, Channels Festival 2017 presents a new commission by Melbourne-based South Sudanese artist Atong Atem, continuing her ongoing interest and research into migrant narratives, postcolonial practices, and the exploration of self and identity.

Atong Atem is a Melbourne based artist whose work gravitates around her South Sudanese heritage and its relation to forming identity in Australia. Atem has exhibited at Centre for Contemporary Photography, Interlude Gallery, (Sydney), Red Hooks Lab (Brooklyn), Gertrude Contemporary, Next Wave Festival, First Draft (Sydney) and Ambush
 

Aaron Claringbold
Saturday, 12 August, 2017 to Sunday, 22 October, 2017

Aaron Claringbold
Fruits (from Confluence) 2016
Damaged Polaroid (Fujifilm-100c45) 10.1 x 12.7 cm

In Confluence, Aaron Claringbold investigates non-Indigenous relation to place and connection to land in light of his personal heritage, and a sense of being complicit in the ongoing colonisation of Australia. He explores the Birrarung and Merri Merri Creeks as a confluence a merging of movement and flow. Confluence is based around introduced elements within the urban and re-naturalised environment, the waterways and surrounding parklands of the Merri Merri area.

ENGAGE
ARTIST’S TALK | Sat 16 September | 2pm | Details here

 

Hayley Millar-Baker
Wednesday, 9 August, 2017 to Sunday, 22 October, 2017

Hayley Millar-Baker
Untitled 7 (If This is My Land) 2016
Digital collage on paper | 59.4 x 42 cm

In My Mirring, Hayley Millar-Baker explores her deep connection to land and highlights the contemporary Indigenous experience of Country. For Hayley, it’s from within the Australian bush that answers to personal issues are provided: for growth, clarity, satisfaction and cleansing. In this photographic series, Hayley explores narratives of Australian history through a postcolonial lens. She combines Aboriginal Dreamtime characters and alternative views of history to share her personal perspective.

ENGAGE
ARTISTS TALK | Sat 16 September | 2pm | Details here

Carly Fischer
Saturday, 12 August, 2017 to Monday, 23 October, 2017

Carly Fischer

Make Australia Great Again 2017
Found wooden household objects, Tasmanian Oak, Pine, Jelutong, MDF, adhesives, acrylic paint and varnish. | Dimensions variable Photograph: Georgia Papagiannis Courtesy of the artist ABOVE Aaron Claringbold Fruits (from Con uence), 2016 Damaged Polaroid (Fuji lm-100c45) 10.1 x 12.7 cm

 

Carly Fischer’s latest sculptural installation reflects on how corporations market products towards culturally, environmentally and politically aware Australians. Drawing on the protest song by Paul Kelly and Kev Carmody, her installation questions whether cultural resistance can escape being appropriated, commodifed and sold back to us as gentrifed lifestyle packages. Products and cultural objects are referenced, reassembled, remixed and reconstructed as strange hybrid sculptural propositions.

Dana Harris
Wednesday, 9 August, 2017 to Sunday, 22 October, 2017

Dana Harris
Grid 3000 2016
Cotton, steel | 86 x 77 cm Courtesy of the artist | Photograph by Peter Atkins

Dana Harris is obsessed with mapping and drawing space as a way of marking physical space and time to reveal and understand their connections. She looks to science, history, design and architecture, searching for connections to explore. Dana intimately examines details that are specific and particular but often temporary or unnoticed and transforms the connections into large-scale textile-based drawings. In Survey, Dana creates a new installation in the foyer area, drawing inspiration from the architecture and history of Bundoora Homestead.

Justin Shoulder
Wednesday, 9 August, 2017 to Sunday, 22 October, 2017

Justin Shoulder
V 2010
In collaboration with Amy Gebhardt and Paola Morabito Video still (detail) | Courtesy of the artist

Explore a fantastical world infused with biometrics, mutations and intangible forces. This screening reveals a reverence for the theatrical, defying logic whilst living and breathing the absurd. is a subterranean exploration of the occult—showcasing one of Justin’s Fantastic Creatures — an invented alter-persona based on queered ancestral mythologies. In Deep Alamat, witness Justin and collaborator Bhenji Ra perform in hostile landscapes with reference to the queer, migrant, spiritual and intercultural.

Kirrily Hammond + Sim Luttin
Wednesday, 9 August, 2017 to Sunday, 22 October, 2017

Sim Luttin
Moment #1: Backyard view 2017
sterling silver, sublimated aluminium, glass 4.1 x 6.9 x 1.0 cm (pendant)

Contemplating the quiet moments when we consciously pause and ruminate before ‘busy’ takes over, Keepsake explores the personal moments found in our urban environments and strives to capture small moments of the sublime in the everyday. In a unique combination of painting and jewellery practices, Keepsake showcases intimate oil paintings on copper by Kirrily Hammond and contemporary jewellery and photography by Sim Luttin. Presented as part of Radiant Pavilion.

Aya Hamamoto
Wednesday, 4 October, 2017 to Saturday, 21 October, 2017

Aya Hamamoto, The Inaudible Song, 2017, video still. Images courtesy of the artist.

Her Song is an exhibition that seeks to investigate a way to give presence to the intangible or the physicality of loss by examining the sensory dimensions of a performance-based installation. This attempt has been grounded in Aya Hamamoto’s personal reflections on grieving over her sister’s death, and responses through artworks to her profound connection with her late sister that continuously affects Hamamoto’s manner of being in the present. Through a focus on the tactility of human voice, this exhibition explores the potential for the sensory relation of her voice with moving images to embody the evanescent texture of loss.

Hamamoto’s strong bond of sisterhood has motivated her to employ singing as a method to illuminate the radiance of her sister’s lost presence and the energetic essence of the young life. Her sister dedicated her life to her dream of becoming a musician, a dream cut short by her sudden death. When Hamamoto sings a Japanese choral piece with silent interludes, she sees echoes of her sister’s powerful presence in the melody, recalling her memory of singing it together. By tracing the inaudible melody through her voice resembling her sister’s, the performance overlays the texture of her sister’s absent presence with her mortal body. Her durational singing ultimately generates a space to lament the ephemera of life.

While enduring the agony of revisiting the tragic incident, her work creates a physical public reminder of her sister’s intangible presence, celebrating her short life. Through revealing the irreducibility of her sister’s existence within herself, her practice continues to declare the invaluable value of her sister’s being. In this sense, the practice internalizes her artistic engagements into her endless mourning process. By doing so, Hamamoto’s performance-based installation proposes a way that art can exist as an attitude towards life.

Nick Modrzewski + Nabilah Nordin
Wednesday, 4 October, 2017 to Saturday, 21 October, 2017

Nabilah Nordin, DEAR CONTAINER, 2015, dimensions variable, mixed media. Image courtesy of the artist. 

Mark all as Read is a discursive exhibition chronicling the experiences and collaborative practices of artists Nabilah Nordin and Nick Modrzewski.

The culmination of a series of correspondences between Katie Paine, Nordin and Modrzewski as the two artists adjust to their new working and cultural environment in Singapore, the project uses art as a form of cross-cultural communication. As curator, Paine facilitates this body of work through letters, fictional writing and instruction pieces. Nordin and Modrzewski respond with poems, audio recordings, videos, drawings and paintings. Selected works are exhibited.

Jonathan Homsey
Wednesday, 13 September, 2017 to Saturday, 30 September, 2017

Jonathon Homsey, Fragments and Remnants, 2017, performance still. Photography by Giulia Morlando.

Fragments and Remnants (FAR) is an installation using the destruction of visual art as the creation of performance. Inspired by Homsey’s own Syrian ancestry, FAR delves into how allegories and cultural information can be interpreted into a variety of stories and scenarios. Homsey did not discover his ancestry until 2012, where he discovered his ancestry is from the village of Homs and Aleppo for many generations. FAR is Homsey’s platform for self discovery about his own heritage and to help gain empathy for the destruction of his ancestral cities of Homs and Aleppo.

Throughout the exhibition, four allegorical works of pottery will be destroyed as the impetus for choreography. A member of the general public will destroy one of the ceramic works and the broken pieces will deconstruct the original allegory. How stories can be misinterpreted over time is a constant battle in history and archaeology; FAR aims to explore the deconstruction of narratives through this series of four performances.
 

FAR examines how storytelling and historical allegories morph over time and aims to inquire what we can learn from rebuilding fragmented allegories for future generations.